effects of unattended stimuli on performance in a visual search task
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effects of unattended stimuli on performance in a visual search task by Kelly A. Constant

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Published by Laurentian University, Department of Psychology in Sudbury, Ont .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementKelly Constant.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsESS."CO"1989
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 48 l. :
Number of Pages48
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20651142M

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1. Introduction. Visual search tasks have been used extensively to assess how ecologically relevant stimuli capture attention, revealing faster and sometimes more accurate identification of threatening stimuli, such as angry faces (using both photographs, Gerritsen et al., , Hansen and Hansen, ; and schematics, Fox et al., , Öhman et al., a) and snakes and spiders (first Cited by: 3. Effects of adaptation with complex stimuli like faces may thus be distinct from those involving low-level stimulus features (e.g., orientation, color). Although the interaction between visual adaptation and search has been explored by only a handful of studies, search task performance has long been known to be affected by temporal context Cited by: Two sets of stimuli were used. One set produced effortless and parallel search performance in normal controls; the other set was more complex and produced serial search performance in normal controls. Participants performed a visual search task while maintaining items in visual working memory. Experiment 1 used an arrow as a pre-cue indicating which side of the screen the search target would.

1: such patients can process unattended visual stimuli in the absence of conscious awareness of those stimuli. 2: most findings with neglect patients suggest they have damage to the ventral attention network leading to impaired functioning of the undamaged intact dorsal attention network. Effects of visual and auditory stimuli in a choice reaction time task Viviane Freire Bueno, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro-do-Valle Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil Abstract The effect produced by a warning stimulus(i) (WS) in reaction time (RT) tasks is commonly attributed to a facilitation of sensorimotor mechanisms by alertness.   The process of pilot constantly checking the information given by instruments was examined in this study to detect the effects of time pressure and task difficulty on visual searching. A software was designed to simulate visual detection tasks, Author: Xiaoli Fan, Qianxiang Zhou, Fang Xie, Zhongqi Liu. Visual complexity and user performance. The functions of the VST and the recognition task were to investigate possible effects of visual complexity on users’ performance. The results from the VST showed that visual complexity influences search performance on by:

Visual search is a type of perceptual task requiring attention that typically involves an active scan of the visual environment for a particular object or feature (the target) among other objects or features (the distractors). Visual search can take place with or without eye movements. The ability to consciously locate an object or target amongst a complex array of stimuli has been extensively. Hence, we have shown that the discrimination of changes in the unattended visual field is possible for visual complex stimuli. In the “Attend” condition, we see a somewhat surprising result, namely that in case of incorrect direction estimations RTs are significantly Cited by: Kelly A. Constant has written: 'The effects of unattended stimuli on performance in a visual search task' Asked in Science, Biology, Isuzu Impulse How chemical stimuli transduced into electrical. Processing of the unattended message during selective dichotic listening - Volume 9 Issue 1 - R. Näätänen Bouma, H. () Visual search and reading: Eye movements and functional visual field: A tutorial review. In: Electrodermal responses to attended and unattended significant stimuli during dichotic by: