Indoor radon risk, remediation and recommendations
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Indoor radon risk, remediation and recommendations a vice-chairman"s report.

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Published by Legislative Commission on Science and Technology, State of New York, Office of the Vice-Chairman in Albany, NY .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Radon -- Environmental aspects.,
  • Health risk assessment.,
  • Housing and health.

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsVolker, Dale M., New York (State). Legislature. Legislative Commission on Science & Technology
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination15 p.
Number of Pages15
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22255495M

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The WHO handbook on indoor radon is a key product of the WHO International Radon Project. This handbook book focuses on residential radon exposure from a public health point of view and provides detailed recommendations on reducing health risks from radon and sound policy options for preventing and mitigating radon exposure. Previous economic evaluations of radon prevention and mitigation 62 Example of a cost-effectiveness analysis 63 5. RADON RISK COMMUNICATION 73 Fundamentals, strategies and channels 74 Framing radon risk issues for risk communication 75 Core messages for radon risk communication 78 Communication campaigns 79 6. NATIONAL. Even if analyses indicate that remediation programmes are not cost-effective on a nationwide basis, indoor radon at high concentrations poses a considerable risk of lung cancer for individuals and requires mitigation. Since the general public is often unaware of the risks associated with indoor radon, special risk communication is recommended. The WHO handbook on indoor radon is a key product of the WHO International Radon Project, which was launched in The handbook focuses on residential radon exposure from a public health point of view and provides detailed recommendations on reducing health risks from radon as well as policy options for preventing and mitigating radon exposure.. The material in this handbook reflects the.

WHO Handbook on Indoor Radon Book Review: This handbook focuses on residential radon exposure from a public health point of view and provides detailed recommendations on reducing health risks from radon and sound policy options for preventing and mitigating radon exposure. topic. Indoor radon risk awareness could be most effectively tackled using a multidisciplinary approach, which includes pneumologists, epidemiologists, oncologists, architects, industrial hygienists and others. But the key role remains for pneumologists and public health authorities, because indoor radon is related to lung cancer. Radon is found everywhere in outdoor and indoor air of buildings of all kinds, including homes. It is a naturally occurring, radioactive element—meaning it gives off radiation—that occurs as a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. Radon comes from the natural decay of radioactive elements in soil, rock and water. As these elements, such as. Seasonal, weekly and daily variability was observed for indoor air pollutants such as radon, CO 2 and RH with higher levels recorded during the night hours of the cold season. The average indoor temperature during the heated season was within national recommendations of 20 °C to 27 °C (Regulation22/06/, n.d.) in all investigated CO 2 concentration recorded in 10 houses .

INTRODUCTION. Increased awareness concerning health effects of radon exposure led to a significant revision of recommendations and regulations from international organisations and institutions (1, 2).Within this context, scientists from many European countries joined into the European project Radon Prevention And Remediation (RADPAR), a 3-y European research project aimed to assist in reducing.   Radon Mitigation Standards for Schools and Large Buildings (RMS-LB ) Exit This new American National Standard addresses the complexities of properly mitigating radon in large and complicated building structures that require specialized techniques and quality assurance to address complicated building designs and specialized airflow. Radon is found in outdoor air and in the indoor air of buildings of all kinds. EPA recommends homes be fixed if the radon level is 4 pCi/L (picocurries per liter) or more. Because there is no known safe level of exposure to radon, EPA also recommends that Americans consider fixing their home for radon levels between 2 pCi/L and 4 pCi/L. The WHO Handbook on Indoor Radon: A Public Health Perspective indicates that radon exposure is a major and growing public health threat in homes and recommends that countries adopt reference levels of the gas of Bq/m3 which is equivalent to pCi/L. You can download a PDF version of the WHO handbook on indoor radon here.